目前日期文章:200706 (5)

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This project provides the opportunity to develop two themes: one on the geographical anchorage of the structure on the river, the other on the sign of modernism attached to the technological and artisanal capacities of contemporary China. The project combines a complex structure fashioned by multiple arches developed in space according to the unchanging necessities but also developed on the essential links between these arches which were labeled in the project as “the petals”. These petals have two objectives: to connect the arcs to form a rigid structure resistant to the buckling of the very fine members of its arches, and to capture the light day and night along with the movements of the sun , and in function with the orientation of the cars on the roadway. The 9 arches of the central span consist of box-girders welded together, where their dimensions are reduced to 40 cm wide by 55 cm high for a span of 127 m. They are shaped along the curves developing in the space permitting a global variation of the inertia of the structure according to the needs of the course of the forces. 128 petals link these arches to align and account for the internal stiffeners of this spatial structure. They are of 64 different types, varying between 2 m x 3 m and reaching up to 9 m in their maximum dimension. They form double curvature surfaces aligned by the geometric links between the arcs and their position in space. The tailoring of these petals is a very particular expression of the connection between very advanced technology (reinforced polymerized fiberglass resin and metallic structure) and learned crafting in the fabrication of 64 molds of complex and elaborate geometries. By day, the petals capture, in their east-west orientation, the movements of the sun in the Tianjin sky. By night, they serve as large diffusers of light and transform the structure into a succession of orientated and separated reflectors floating above the river.




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Thom Faulders has created an exterior building skin for a new four storey multi-family dwelling unit with photography studios in Tokyo, Japan designed by Hajime Masubuchi of Studio M. Located in the Kitamagome Ota-ku district, the site was previously occupied by the owner’s family with a residence uniquely wrapped by a layer of dense vegetation. Since the entire site is to be razed to accommodate construction for the new larger development, the design invents an architectural system that performs with similar attributes to the demolished green strip and creates an atmospheric space of activity. Conceived as a thin interstitial environment, the articulated densities of the new open-celled meshwork are layered in response to the inner workings of the building’s program. AirSpace Tokyo is a zone where the artificial blends with nature: sunlight is refracted along its metallic surfaces; rainwater is channeled away from exterior walkways via capillary action; and interior views are shielded behind its variegated and foliage-like cover. The complex pattern for Airspace Tokyo is developed in collaboration with Proces2 Design in San Francisco using parametric software. The dual-layered skins are constructed of an aluminum and plastic composite material often used for large billboards. 





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The two buildings are organised around a central square next to the existing cultural centre. In opposition to that centre, they appear as smooth volumes, covered with an articulated and semitransparent skin of pivoting mesh panels - open buildings, clearly readable for every visitor. The building of the administrative centre tries to push the concept of durability as far as possible. Modular open-plan offices on concrete floor slabs, without beams and without false ceilings, maximise the flexibility and allow free positioning of partition walls. All technical equipment is recessed in access floors. The same type of construction will be used for the library (phase 2, completion 2007 - 2008). Pluvial water from the roof is stored in concrete tanks in the basement, from where it is recycled for toilet flushing, as fire fighting water, and as a source of cooling in the summer. Hot water is provided by solar panels in the glass shed roof of the central atrium. Auxiliary electric power is generated by photovoltaic cells. A fine tuned system of free cooling and night cooling allows affordable thermal comfort in the summer combined with very low power consumption.




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This building is located in a 10 mts. wide plot, in a typically urban block in Buenos Aires. The 12 two-storey residential units are split in two compact blocks bridged by a lightweight steel tower which connects them. This structure contains the lift shaft, the main stair and the connecting bridges. Due to the fact that the street was so narrow, the building was recessed to gain privacy from its neighbours, but recomposes the street front with a light frame. This steel grid with wooden deck floors attached to the building façades act both as the apartment expansion terraces and as louvers that guarantee filtered natural light and heat control. During the night the building interacts, turned on as a light box, with the steel frame making it look like a Chinese shadow puppet. Both blocks float over the ground floor, resting on eight concrete columns and gaining lightness and visuals from the street entrance through the rear yard, which was kept like a small garden.





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Lord Falconer, the Lord Chancellor and the Secretary of State for Justice, visited the new Manchester Civil Justice Centre as Denton Corker Marshall’s Guest of Honour at a special preview on Wednesday 30th May 2007. Founding Directors John Denton, Bill Corker and Barrie Marshall will fly from Melbourne to Manchester today to host the event which marks the practice’s first major civic building in the UK. John Denton, Founding Director of Denton Corker Marshall added, “We are delighted that Lord Falconer is able join us in Manchester to celebrate our practice’s first major public project in the UK.

We wanted to create a building that would not only signal and display the transparency and accessibility of the courts and courts system, but that would also become a strong sculptural urban marker for the city. It forms an integral part of Allied London Properties regeneration of the Spinningfields area in the city and we hope that in time, it will help promote civic confidence and pride in this part of Manchester.” Stuart Lyell, Allied London Development Director said: "Outstanding architecture lies at the heart of all Allied London developments. The international design competition for the new Civil Justice Centre has resulted in a truly world-class signature building and Denton Corker Marshall are to be congratulated on realising their vision. 

This magnificent civic building gives Manchester a new iconic landmark an important contribution to the huge success of Spinningfields, one of the most significant office-led mixed use developments in Europe." Manchester Civil Justice Centre is the largest court complex to be built in the UK since the Royal Courts of Justice in the 19th Century. It will be the new HQ for the Ministry for Justice in the North West, providing accommodation of around 34,000m² on 15 levels. It houses 47 courtrooms, 75 consultation rooms, in addition to office and support space. Sir Richard Leese, Leader of Manchester City Council said: "The Civil Justice Centre is an exemplar of how cutting-edge architecture can be incorporated within the existing city fabric to provide a building of world-class design quality for a world class city. The building provides an exciting addition to the city's skyline and is a key contributor to the regeneration of Spinningfields."




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